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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking at a super small and concealable gun that can fire big bullets ? The concept of a Derringer (originally Deringer, with one “r”) has remained immensely popular since its inception. And that idea has kept these tiny defensive powerhouses in production for over 150 years. Early 1900s Remington Arms-U.

5 Best Derringers: Our Favorite Tiny Bois

5 Best Derringers: Our Favorite Tiny BoisTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking at a super small and concealable gun that can fire big bullets ? The concept of a Derringer (originally Deringer, with one “r”) has remained immensely popular since its inception. And that idea has kept these tiny defensive powerhouses in production for over 150 years. Early 1900s Remington Arms-U.M.C. Type III Double Derringer, Rock Island Auction House Today, many people choose to carry a Derringer as a backup weapon, or as an easy pocket carry option that still has the power to stop a threat with authority. That said, most people default to similarly sized pocket guns like the Ruger LCP and the like now, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. A small gun, with a heavy trigger, difficult-to-operate hammer, and a perilously short sight radius isn’t exactly an ideal self-defense gun, especially when there are so many easier to use options available. Carrying a Derringer isn’t limited to pockets anymore! If you’re interested in a modern derringer, you have a few options to choose from, and you should think long and hard about what you need and whether or not you’re getting a quality product. Looking for something that’s tiny, cheap, and chambered in a caliber starting with “4” is a great way to accidentally buy a hand grenade if you aren’t careful. Be sure to do your research thoroughly. Or you can just get one of the great derringers on this list. …But First, a Little Background on Derringers Way back in 1852, John Deringer (one “r”) came up with the idea for a small, easily-concealed pistol with a large bore that could be conveniently carried in the outer pocket of a gentleman’s coat. Civilized men in 1857 wore coats with small pockets. Called the Philadelphia Deringer, it immediately caught on and spawned a huge number of copies which, to avoid trademark issues were sold as Derringers (with two “r”s). Capitalism happened, and the name of the copy stuck. Today, derringers are sold all over the world and are still incredibly popular with those looking to defend themselves, but mostly they are novelties, range toys, and just interesting things to have around. That said, they’ll still put a big hole in a threat, so don’t discount them for self-defense, even if there are better options out there these days. Philadelphia Deringer So if you’re looking for a modern derringer, where should you start? I’m glad you asked. Here are the best, and most practical, derringers on the market. Best Derringers 1. Bond Arms Backup Bond Arms is a name you’ll hear a lot when looking at derringers, and with good reason: they’re basically the industry standard, and to my knowledge one of very few manufacturers that put serious effort into derringers these days. The Backup is one of their most popular models and is chambered in a wrist-friendly caliber: .45 ACP. Like most of their products however, you can quickly and easily do a caliber swap and drop in different length and caliber barrels as you see fit. Best .45 ACP Self-Defense Federal .45 ACP 230 gr HST 28 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 28 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing This is one of the best things about the Bond Arms series of derringers. There are about 20 different calibers available to choose from when it comes to accessory barrels. This one ships with a 2.5” barrel, which is plenty of barrel for the type of “get off me” shooting these guns are designed for. I wouldn’t want to have to shoot much past 7 yards, but inside that distance, which is where most self-defense scenarios happen, this thing is more than capable of ruining a bad guys day . "Bond Arms Backup" 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing In fact, as a backup weapon for either pocket carry, or to keep in an ankle holster, I think it’s pretty excellent. It’s definitely not perfect, and any kind of multi-target engagement is going to be a problem, but for what it is, and for the most common self-defense scenarios, it does perfectly well. And while you may not want to carry that Glock 19 because you’re “just running to the store” or “just checking the mail” this thing can easily be dropped into a pocket and forgotten about, right up until you need it. Please…don’t be this guy… Like most (all) derringers, the trigger is stiff, and the hammer is hard to pull back so make sure you have the hand strength to handle that and don’t expect to be hitting anything further than 10 yards or so reliably, but for a “bad breath distance” gun it’s definitely worth considering. Would I take it over a Glock 43 ? Not if I could help it. Would I take it over nothing at all? Absolutely. 2. Bond Arms Snake Slayer The Snake Slayer is Bond Arms’ most popular model, and comes with a 3.5” barrel, and is available chambered in either .357 Mag/.38 Special, or .45 LC/.410. Either way, you get a little more barrel, a little less recoil, and a lot more accuracy over the Backup model, especially with the .357 Mag version. "Bond Arms Snake" Slayer 511 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 511 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Sportsman's Guide (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Overall, I’d say the Backup is probably ideal as exactly that…a backup. Whereas this is better as a primary weapon. The sight radius, such as it is, is almost usable, and the caliber options give you a little more flexibility as well. The .45LC/.410 one, in particular, is a favorite of hunters and outdoorsmen in snake country, as you might have expected from the name, and the .357/.38 version gives you more options when it comes to defending yourself against two-legged threats. (L to R), .45 ACP, .45 Long Colt, .45-70 Government As with most of Bond Arms’ products, you can swap barrels out to your heart’s content, but for me, I like the .357/.38 one an awful lot. Between those two cartridges, you will never struggle to find ammo, and you’ll be well equipped to deal with most anything short of a bear or other dangerous game. The .410 option gives you a good defense against snakes and other small pests, and can even offer some good survival weapon potential. In fact, I’d say a Bond Arms Snake Slayer is a pretty great little survival gun for a lightweight bugout kit, or just as something to keep in your pack when you’re wandering the backcountry. .410 Birdshot and Self Defense Rounds They also fit nicely in a glovebox or center console to help keep you safe from everything from carjackers to that rattlesnake curled up in the barn. I think the survival gun last ditch truck gun tackle box gun is where derringers really shine anyway, places where you need something small and light to tuck out of the way, so something like the Snake Slayer really makes sense in that respect. 3. Bond Arms Ranger II The Bond Arms Ranger II is probably the easiest derringer to shoot on this list. It comes with a 4.25” barrel which is honestly bigger than what most people would expect from a derringer. That’s a very useful and usable barrel length no matter how you slice it, and it does well with the .410/.45LC barrels. Bond Arms Snake Slayer 511 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 511 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Sportsman's Guide (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing It does all the same things as the other derringers, but there’s one place you may see them that you wouldn’t otherwise expect: cowboy action competition . These things are wildly popular there, and I can only imagine it’s because they are positively tame when shooting soft-recoiling cowboy action loads. Even if you’re not planning on living out your wild west fantasies, the Ranger II is a great choice. For one, if you’re locked into getting a derringer, this is one of the most practical ones out there. You can even get holsters for it! You get all the solid upsides of a derringer in that it is simple, easy to use, and virtually bombproof, and you get all that in a fairly usable package that you can either take into the woods as a backup, or keep on you to have a fair chance of defending yourself when you don’t feel like taking a larger or heavier gun. And of course, for something that’s just plain fun to shoot at the range, or during a cowboy action match you want to be a little silly with, there are few things better. This derringer won’t beat your hand up like the others either, so you won’t shoot it once and leave it in the back of the safe until you decide to trade it in towards a J-frame or something similar. What’s your take on the Bond Arms? Readers' Ratings 4.92/5 (170) Your Rating? 4. American Derringer Model M-4 Alaskan Are you looking for a survival derringer? I mean a derringer that will help you survive almost anything? Well, the "American Derringer Model" M-4 Alaskan may be exactly what you need. American Derringer Model M-4 Alaskan This thing has a 4.1” barrel chambered in .410/.45LC, which is pretty standard for derringers like this. This gives you the option of the big .45LC throwing serious bullets around, and also the versatility of the .410 which gives you a wide variety of options for what you can do with the gun. There are about a million .410 loads out there, and you can use all of them with this. But this derringer has another barrel. And it’s not chambered in .410, .45LC, .45 ACP, or anything else we’ve talked about so far. It’s chambered in .45-70 Govt. Hornady Lever Revolution .45-70 vs 5.56 If you’ve ever shot a rifle chambered in .45-70, you probably felt it in your shoulder the next day. I personally have no desire to ever shoot one again. No thank you. In a pistol? Not even a full-size revolver, but a derringer? I hope you have good insurance cause your wrist is in serious danger of splintering into a bunch of little pieces. Seriously, .45-70 Govt in a derringer that only weighs about a pound? I don’t know that I could even hold onto such a thing…or that I would want to. So why put it on this list? Why is it even a thing that exists? Surely it’s just a joke gun, right? A meme cannon to let your buddies shoot at the range with no practical value? Well…not quite. In this wide world, there are some big animals that never got the memo that we humans are the top of the food chain. In North America, this means bears. Even a big enough black bear is going to laugh at your Glock 19, especially if it’s already on top of you. Nothing on Earth is going to shrug off a .45-70 though, save maybe a whale. This is the ultimate contact distance gun for surviving a bear attack and I think as a backup to either a 12 gauge, big-bore rifle, or a hefty revolver in something like .454 Casul, this is a neat thing to have. Ruger Super Redhawk in 45 Colt/454 Casull Set Up to Hunt I trust my life to a shotgun in big bear territory, and I think that this shouldn’t be your number one option, but as a light back up? As a last ditch effort to get a 1000lb Grizzly off of you, or at least take the big asshole with you? I’ll take it over trying to hit the thing with an empty shotgun or revolver, that’s for sure. As a survival gun that can pack down extremely light, and that can be used as a practical(ish) hunting weapon in case your plane goes down in Alaskan backcountry or your boat sinks or whatever, it certainly isn’t half bad either as you still have that other barrel that shoots the more practical .45LC and .410 loads. Just make sure you don’t accidentally touch off the .45-70 load instead. Finally, it’s just a freakin’ hilarious thing to own. A .45-70 derringer is something that is almost worth owning just to say you have one, and occasionally breaking it out at the range is certainly going to turn some heads. There is one problem…it doesn’t look like you can get these new anymore, so you have to fend for yourself on ArmsList or Gunbroker . Honorable Mention There are a few guns out there that a lot of people call a “derringer” even though they don’t technically meet the accepted definition, or aren’t quite a normal derringer. These are the sort of thing that you might also be interested in if derringers are your thing. And there’s one thing most of you were probably thinking of when you started reading this article… NAA Mini Revolvers NAA specializes in some really well-designed, good looking, and surprisingly functional mini revolvers chambered in .22LR, .22 Short, or .22 Mag. These little revolvers are in some cases little bigger than a swiss army knife and carry 5 rounds of .22 in a shockingly usable package. NAA Mini Revolvers 215 at Sportsman's Guide Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 215 at Sportsman's Guide Prices accurate at time of writing They also make full-size revolvers and such, but their mini revolvers are definitely the big crowd pleaser here. At 4” long, and weighing in at less than 5oz, your biggest problem might be leaving one in your jeans and forgetting it’s in there. .22 LR isn’t the world’s best self-defense round by any means, but I don’t think anyone wants to get shot by one either. As a contact-distance weapon, it’s certainly better than nothing, especially if you can shove it against your attackers head or face, and at distances of a few feet, it’ll do alright. NAA Mini Revolvers 2 This is definitely not my first choice for self-defense, but any port is better than being out on the sea in a storm, and any gun you have on you is better than not having one at all when your life’s on the line. Beyond self-defense, good lord are these things fun. They have almost no recoil, are surprisingly accurate if a bit challenging to use, and for plinking at the range, there are few things that will help your dollar stretch further ammo-wise. Final Thoughts The derringer may be a little old-fashioned but it hasn’t gone the way of the dodo just yet. There are still some people out there who carry them every day, whether because they like the idea of a lightweight pocket gun that they can always have on them, or because they’re just plain cool. Then again, they can be surprisingly fun at the range as well, and will certainly stand out from all the black rifles and polymer pistols that will be taking up the lanes all around you. Whatever your reason, if you’re looking to own a derringer, there are some great options out there, including some ones that make great carry guns, great survival weapons, or great range toys. What do you think of derringers? Which one of these is your favorite? Let me hear from you in the comments! For some more…normal CCW weapons, check out our Best Concealed Carry Guns guide!

How-To: Block Bedding Synthetic-Stock Rifles

How-To: Block Bedding Synthetic-Stock Rifles

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f37858920195_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f37858920195_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Block bedding is a very effective way to accurize the newer factory synthetic stocks that have internally structured compartments in the forend and around the action area. Block bedding basically involves surrounding the recoil lug with a block of steel. You'll bed the rifle at four points: recoil lug, back of tang, around the two guard screws. A metal epoxy, such as Devcon, is used to create the bedding. Modeling clay is used to control its flow in the stock. If this doesn't work for you, the block in front of the lug can be removed. Then the entire barrel is free floated. The contact pads of the forend are removed, since you are bedding the rifle in order to provide the stabilization needed for best accuracy. Block Bedding A Synthetic Stock So, what is block bedding ? Basically, block bedding involves surrounding the recoil lug of the rifle with a giant block of solid steel. It’s accomplished by filling in the structural chambers in front of and behind the recoil lug. There are two chambers directly in front of the lug that measure about .750 of an inch, and two chambers behind the lug that measure about 1.25 inches, which becomes our 2-inch block of steel. To get started, ensure the rifle is unloaded, and remove the two stock screws and the bolt. Take the floorplate off, along with the magazine box. Separate the stock from the rifle. Notice on the forend’s tip that there are two pads of material. Fire up your Dremel or Foredom tool, and remove these two pads. They are there to provide upward pressure on the barrel when the stock is screwed on, and keep reverberation to a minimum upon firing. Modeling clay is used to block off the area where you do not want epoxy to flow. Old-time benchrest shooters tried this technique with varying levels of success in the 1960s with wood stocks, and it’s an inexpensive way for a mass-produced firearm to achieve a decent level of accuracy out of the box, but you can do better. You are going to bed this rifle at four points — bedding the recoil lug, back of the tang, and around the two guard screws underneath the rifle at the trigger guard. First scrape out the stock material where the bedding material will go. This ensures a large enough gap for the bedding material, as you don’t want stock-to-metal contact. Always maintain a gap between the stock and the firearm, this will make room for the epoxy. Related GunDigest Articles 8 Pieces Of Shooting Gear To Build A Top Range Bag How To Care For And Upgrade AR Springs How To: Customizing The AR So It's Race Ready Also, by scraping, it will rough up the stock so the epoxy will stick to it. You will need to use sandpaper to really rough it up. I use #120 grit, and if I had access to a bead blasting cabinet, I would tape off the stock and bead blast the epoxy areas to further rough it up. After scraping and sanding, spray it out with brake cleaner and blow it dry. Next step is to tape the barrel. You want to free float the barrel, but you need to extend the bedding material out in front of the recoil lug about ¾ of an inch, rather than have the barrel completely free floating like you would when using the spot bedding technique. Make sure you get a good squeeze of epoxy. This will give a visual assurance that the bedding material has flowed into all of the areas where support is needed. Tape off the front of the barrel at the forend tip, and wrap tape around the barrel ¾-inches in front of the recoil lug. Look down the muzzle of the rifle to make sure the barreled action is exactly on center and you haven’t used too much tape, causing it to sit too high. Everything should be leveled and centered at this point. Next get out the modeling clay, and fill the barrel channel chambers in front of the two chambers you are using that are located in front of the recoil lug. That is, from front to back, epoxy goes in the two chambers in front of the lug, then the lug chamber, and two chambers behind the lug. See the photo if this is not perfectly clear. You want to fill the two chambers in front of and behind the recoil lug, but don’t waste expensive epoxy by allowing it to flow into chambers where it’s not needed. Next, spray release agent onto the areas of the barreled action, the stockmakers’ screws and the floorplate. Remove the magazine follower and spring from the floorplate, as these just get in the way. Once you have everything taped off, greased up with release agent, and modeling clay applied in places you don’t want the epoxy to flow, mix Devcon in a 2.5 to 1 ratio. Screw the rifle together with the stockmakers’ screws to allow everything to set up overnight. Apply it to the four points within the stock, starting with the chambers in and around the recoil lug. There is a special technique to use when filling in deep areas like that with an epoxy that has a thick consistency such as Devcon. Use a Popsicle stick to apply a thick glob of epoxy down into the chamber, stir with a butter-churn action to get the bubbles out; otherwise, large voids and bubbles will form, negating the beneficial effects of a big block of steel around the recoil lug, which is the whole reason for doing this job.

Spetsnaz-Eye View of the AK

Spetsnaz-Eye View of the AK

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d3df2c55_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d3df2c55_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Marco Vorobiev works the charging handle of his AK-74. Nobody knows the AK like Marco Vorobiev. The former Soviet solider has spent nearly his entire life behind the sights of the Kalashnikov and literally knows the rifle from the inside out. Gun Digest was lucky enough to draw upon Vorobiev’s wealth of first-hand experience with the iconic rifle for our most recent book — Gun Digest Shooter’s Guide to AKs . And we were equally as fortunate to recently chat with Vorobiev a bit about his intriguing background and his truly unique interaction with the historic rifle. Gun Digest: Let’s start off with a bit of your background. You were a member of a Soviet Army Spetsnaz unit; some of our readers might not be familiar with the Spetsnaz, would you explain a bit about it and your role as a member? Marco Vorobiev: What it is now is not what it was when I was a part of it. When I was part of the Spetsnaz it was a separate branch of the military, basically what would be called Special Forces. We conducted raids, sabotage and gathered intelligence, among other things. A role of a unit is different depending on its theater and its operational focus. For instance, in Syria now, there are units guiding airstrikes. I served with the Soviet Spetsnaz in Afghanistan in the (19)80s. Our role was counteracting the insurgency. This mainly entailed disruptive activities against the insurgency by annihilating them or disrupting their supplies. We would interdict against convoes, hit Mujahedeen units on the march, assault strongholds and destroy weapons caches. Originally, I served as a sniper for the first six months I was there. I was fire support, so I supported our main assaults, eliminated any kind of reinforcements and pockets of resistance. Some areas of an assault would have more manpower against them; I would outflank and pin them down until they could be annihilated. Once I was older, and my friends were up front with assault groups, I asked to be transferred to an assault group. The request was granted and the rest of the time I was in Afghanistan, 10 months, I was an assaulter. Gun Digest: You were awarded the Order of the Red Star while serving in Afghanistan, would you care to share how you earned the honor? Marco Vorobiev: I was doing the job. You definitely don’t go into combat thinking about winning medals. And I want to point out, I was not the only one who got awarded (in the battle). We were involved in heavy combat, pinned down and grossly outnumbered. We had to tie up the enemy until air support could annihilate them. I was injured in the fight and eventually had to be medevac’d out. My action got my award. I’m proud of the medal, but there were others who deserved the award. Gun Digest: Turning to the topic of your latest book, the AK, when did you first encounter the rifle and what variant was it? Marco Vorobiev: When (the Soviet military) drafts you, they want you to be ready and know what you’re going to fight with. So my first encounter with the AK was around age 12. In school, we did military and patriotic games — running, swimming, fire fighting, climbing walls. It was like a relay. One of the stations was assembling and disassembling the AK-47. That’s where they pulled my card. You have to remember, every school had an armory in the Soviet Union. It had examples of weapons that students would one day use. They were non-functional examples. But we also had .22 rifles to shoot for competition and physical education. And most schools, like mine, had a shooting range in the basement. By age 14, I was familiar with the operation of the AK and its components. By high school, you begin preparatory military courses, to prepare you for your military service. For part of this, we took a field trip to the local military base, where we shot the AK. You were first given three rounds for single shots, then six for bursts. To get an A you had to let off three-round bursts. By the time you left school, you were a trained marksman. Gun Digest: What was your initial impression of it? Marco Vorobiev: By the time of my military service, normalcy. I knew half the world was armed with it, that it was good in war and reliable. You take it as a given. It’s sort of like, you go to the kitchen in the morning and have a bagel for breakfast — it’s just normal. And I couldn’t compare it to anything else, so it never occurred to me that there was another gun that could do this or that. Once I fired it and knew how to hit the targets, it was a normal state of being. Related GunDigest Articles Proper and Effective AK Use Bushnell Offers Shooters New AK Optics New Guns: New AR Rifles Available in 2017 I did have a little gaff. When I was drafted I was given an AK-74, not an AKM (which I used in school). I saw the muzzle break on the (AK-74) and wondered, “Is that a silencer?” Once I fired it I couldn’t believe there was no recoil and it handled really well. I knew that was the gun for me. The first or second time shooting it, I scored 27 out of 30 on the single shot section and also knocked down my targets at 200, 250 and 300 meters firing bursts. I didn’t know it, but the sergeant was behind me and saw my shooting. He ordered the warrant officer to get a SVD. He had me fire it — I can’t remember the distance — and I knocked down the targets he called out. I thought it was easy; with the scope, I thought I could spit and knock down the target. From there I went into sniper training; the SVD was my first issue rifle. Gun Digest: Looking back at your early days behind the rifle, were there any particular aspects of the AK that were difficult to master? Marco Vorobiev: When I first held the gun at age 12, and had my hands on the hunk of metal, I thought, “It’s heavy! How does someone run with this?” The marksman stuff, by the time I was in the military, I was already trained. You don’t have to be an engineer or a mechanic to understand the AK. It is a very simple weapon, very easy to understand. Here is the gas piston, here is the bolt carrier, the firing pin ignites the primer. The rifle was so simply presented to you growing up that a 12-year-old could understand it. Everything about the AK is second nature to me now. Gun Digest: Having the intimate relationship with the Kalashnikov, what do you believe is its greatest advantage over other tactical rifles? Marco Vorobiev: It’s a simple question, but there are many facets to the answer. The greatest advantage, to me — and anyone can argue with me about it — is the layout of the AK’s components that there are only six possible malfunctions and one way to clear the rifle in all cases. It doesn’t matter the malfunction, you just disconnect the magazine, pull the charging handle a few times, put the magazine back in, chamber a round and it’s ready to operate. Some say, “Yeah, but it’s not accurate.” I say, BS. The gun is not inaccurate, that comes down to the shooter. A M4, when you’re talking about 16-inch barrels — a carbine — an AK outshoots it. The gun is designed to strike at 0-1,300 meters a human-sized target. A M4, is out of range at 660 meters. If someone says it’s not accurate, I say, “No — you’re not accurate.” In a trip to Russia a while back, we met a quick reaction team that just the previous day had been in Chechnya. One of the guys said, that while in Chechnya he’d entertain himself shooting wires off telephone polls. A rifle that can shoot wires is not inaccurate. The other thing is, both the M4 and AK were designed as fully automatic weapons, and that’s how they should be evaluated. When all things are equal, the AK, even in the accuracy department, holds its own. The next facet to your questions, some say the AK is not modular enough, but a modular variation of any gun didn’t really come into play until 10-15 years ago. That’s when people started to put trinkets on their guns — scope, flashlight (what infantryman needs a flashlight on their gun?), IR designators. Guess what, the AK was modular before the M16 came around. In the '50s, the USSR issued rails for the rifle to mount night optics. Gun Digest: Country of origin is always a hot topic when it comes to AKs. Would you be willing to share which countries you believe turn out the best Kalashnikovs? Marco Vorobiev: Russia, of course, because any modern improvements have come from there since the Warsaw Pact dissolved. The countries that use to produce them now have to design to NATO specs.

Best .300 Blackout Bolt Carrier Groups (BCG) 2020 Review

Best .300 Blackout Bolt Carrier Groups (BCG)  2020 Review

Finding the best BCG for a .300 Blackout is no easy task. The reason being is that there are a ton of them flooding the market. Most are cheap and low-quality, making it difficult to find a good one that fits a rifle perfectly. However, to reduce the number of headaches and wasted time, we've taken the liberty of tracking down five of the best BCGs for a .300 Blackout. These are what we believe to be the best on the market as of this writing. Before we unveil the list, we're going to discuss what a BCG is and the purpose of it. On top of that, we'll quickly give you a few tips on how to choose a good quality BCG over a poor quality model. At a Glance: Our Top Picks for Bolt Carrier Groups For 300 Blackout OUR TOP PICK: Brownells - M16 Mil-spec MP/HPT BCG Anderson Manufacturing - M16 5.56 BCG 2A Armament - AR-15 BGG BEST BUDGET OPTION: PSA 5.56 Premium Full Auto BCG Cryptic Coatings Mystic Bronze Complete BCG Comparison of the Best .300 Blackout "Bolt Carrier Groups" (BCG) IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Brownells - M16 Mil-spec MP/HPT BCG Staked Gas Key Stained in Matte Black Best .300 Blackout BCG for the Money View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Anderson Manufacturing - M16 5.56 BCG Staked Gas Key Chrome-Lined Interior Bolt and Carrier Made From Steel "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" 2A Armament - AR-15 BGG Easy to Install Constructed From High-Quality Steel All Parts are Heat-Treated and Shot-Peened for Extra Durability and Strength View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Best Budget Option PSA 5.56 "Premium Full Auto" BCG Chrome-Lined Interior Made From Durable Steel Shot-Peened and Pressure Tested View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews "Cryptic Coatings Mystic" Bronze Complete BCG Coated in Bronze Chrome-Lined Interior Crafted From High-Quality Aircraft Grade Steel and Heat-Treated for Extra Durability View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews What is a BCG and How Does it Work? First off, BCG stands for Bolt Carrier Group. This is considered to be the heart of your .300 Blackout rifle . Without it, it’s pretty much useless. This is the engine to your car, so to speak. And of course, the car won’t run if it doesn’t have a functioning engine. So what exactly does the BCG do for your rifle? This is designed to ensure that your firing patterns are smooth and less likely to glitch and jam on you. The same can also be said for the reloading process of your rifle. BCG ( Source ) That’s what you should expect from a good quality BCG. If one frequently jams or gives you grief during the reloading process, it’s useless. The bolt in this accessory is designed to guide the next round into the chamber that emerges via the magazine . This will also ensure that the round is placed correctly and is fully aligned so it won’t jam while ejecting. Aspects to Consider Before Buying a BCG Before you even consider purchasing a BCG, the important thing is to know what factors will go into your decision making. Picking out a product on a whim is not only unwise but can also be a dangerous decision. A constantly malfunctioning accessory will not only cause problems for your rifle but may also pose a safety risk. This should be worth keeping in mind while choosing a good quality BCG. With that in mind, here are some aspects to consider before making a purchase: Price If you’re a .300 Blackout rifle owner on a budget, you’ll obviously consider price as one of your major factors in your buying decision. That is completely understandable. One thing that you need to keep in mind is that price should not be the only factor in your decision. The goal here is to find a BCG that is good in quality and sold at a price that will fit most budgets. The main reason is to ensure that you avoid buying low-quality and cheap product and won’t break the bank purchasing one. Material As mentioned, quality should always be a top priority before anything else. That's why it is important to pay attention to which materials are used to manufacture these BCGs. Nine times out of ten, they will usually be made from either high-quality steel or aluminum. One thing to pay close attention to is the chrome lining found on the inside of the BCG itself. This is designed to prevent it from rusting or corroding from the inside. If you see a BCG that does not have this chrome lining, in particular, avoid it at all cost. The longevity may not be as long-lasting without the proper lining. Installation Of course, the BCG is what makes a rifle function. So obviously, installation is required. The important thing to look for in a BCG is how easy is it to install. The keywords you want to look for when finding something that's easy to install is "drop in". Drop-in means they are easy to install without the use of tools or the professional services of a gunsmith. Quick Take - The BCG For .300 Blackout These are our recommendations for the best BCG for .300 Blackout: Brownells - M16 Mil-spec MP/HPT BCG Anderson Manufacturing - M16 5.56 BCG 2A Armament - AR-15 BGG Review of the Best .300 Blackout BCGs Below are the five best BCGs for a .300 Blackout, in our opinion. These are currently the top products on the market so far. While the list may be subject to change at any point between now and next year, we believe that one of these has the potential to be yours. Remember to read through each of these carefully, as they may have a feature or two that may check off a box on what you’re looking for in a BCG. With that in mind, let’s begin by taking a look at the best overall BCG on the market: Best Overall: Brownells - M16 Mil-spec MP/HPT BCG CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Super Durable Can Handle Just About Any Kind of Abuse Functions Extremely Well for a Budget BCG Cons Ejector Spring May Weaken After a Couple of Thousand Rounds Some Have Complained About Some of the Pins Not Being Secure One Reviewer Complained About Having Difficulty With Moving the Bolt This is perfect for those who are looking for an excellent BCG that also fits their budget. Lucky for them, we’ve found one in the Brownells’ M16 Mil-Spec BCG. This fully-assembled unit comes with the bolt itself, the bolt carrier, and your necessary pins (cam, firing, and fire retaining). Obviously, we can’t forget the gas key that comes with this. The bolt is machined from high-quality carpenter steel. In plain English, that’s a pretty tough piece of steel. After it’s machined, the Brownells’ product will undergo a series of tests. More specifically, they’re all heat-treated and shot-peened to ensure the best in durability. If it passes with flying colors, it will withstand a good amount of abuse or anything else that may try to damage it. The bolt and the BCG are stained in matte black and are designed to give it that mil-spec look. On top of that, you have a gas key that is staked and has an extractor that includes red O-rings with springs. If you’re looking for a high-quality BCG at a price that you can afford, then you might consider the Brownells’ as the best possible choice for a BCG. You deserve a BCG that will help your .300 Blackout rifle function properly. At the same time, you want one that won’t suck the life out of your bank account. This Brownells' brand BCG may be the best for a variety of users. Bottom Line As expected, we found this to be one of the best, most affordable BCGs for .300 Blackout owners. This is not a “you get what you pay for” kind of BCG. You’re getting more than what you pay for. Even if you’re on a budget, this might be a good BCG for you and might surprise you in terms of quality and performance. Super durable and smooth in overall performance is what you’ll get out of the Brownells brand BCG. Runner-up: ​ Anderson Manufacturing - M16 5.56 BCG CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Stakes Are Quite Strong Great Shot Groups at 100 Yards Out Performs Flawlessly for Most .300 Blackout Rifles Cons Gas Key May Need to be Restaked if Such a Situation Were Warranted Next up, we’re going to be looking at the Anderson Manufacturing M16 5.56 BCG. Both the bolt and the carrier are crafted from high-quality steel, which means that these are going to be tough as nails and impervious to any kind of abuse you can think of. Shot-peened? Check. Heat-treated? You got it. Chrome-lined interior? Yep. Inside and out, you can expect this to be resistant to corrosion or rust. In other words, this is going to work hand in hand with your .300 Blackout rifle for many years to come. All the parts and components are stained in a black matte finish, making it blend in perfectly with most .300 Blackout rifles. Bottom Line The Anderson Manufacturing BCG is a battle-tested, tough-as-nails kind of accessory that does its job in delivering reliable, non-jamming shots for your rifle. Once installed, you can expect your rifle to shoot well and be able to cycle properly without any issues to speak of. This BCG is easy to install and very simple to put to good use. If that’s what you’re looking for in an accessory like this, get the Anderson Manufacturing BCG. 3. 2A Armament - AR-15 BGG CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Very Easy to Install Helps Rifles Shoot Very Well Super Easy to Adjust When Accessing it Via the Port Door Cons None The next BCG we’ll be taking a look at is the 2A Armament AR-15 BCG. Right off the bat, you’ll notice that this is a lightweight BCG that won’t add any unnecessary weight to your gun once you have it installed. Since you have a rugged, fully-loaded .300 Blackout rifle at your disposal, you have enough weight to carry around as it is. This BCG has passed pretty much every manufacturing test known to man and proves itself to be a super tough and super reliable unit for your rifle. Every single piece of this BCG is heat-treated, shot-peened, and machined from highly durable steel. Inside and out, this is one tough puppy. On top of all this, this is a drop-in BCG that is easy to install and ready to go the second it’s set up. If you think you need a gas block for your rifle, you don’t need to worry about that. That’s because the 2A Armament BCG will be in tune with your .300 Blackout rifle’s gas system . The big surprise, this also fits perfectly with all kinds of parts like springs, barrel lengths , and suppressors . You can adjust this BCG via the port door. That means you don’t have to disassemble the entire rifle just for the sake of adjustments. Bottom Line The 2A Armament BCG sticks out as one of the best on the market for a few good reasons. Inside and out, this is designed to handle a serious beating. At the same time, this will help your .300 Blackout rifle function like a well-oiled machine. What impressed us the most is that it does away with the idea of using a gas block and doing away with disassembling a rifle just to make some minor adjustments. With that in mind, the 2A Armament is worth the extra look if you’re looking for a BCG that is easy to install, easy to adjust, and allows your gun to easily fire without jamming or other functioning issues. 4. PSA 5.56 Premium Full Auto BCG CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Can Tolerate a Lot of Abuse Functions Without Any Issues of Jamming A Very Good BCG for Those Who Appreciate Mil-Spec Accessories Cons Fit and Finish Could Be Better One "Reviewer Complained About" This Being a Basic BCG. Some Have Claimed That the Gas Key isn’t as Staked as it’s Supposed to. Next, we'll be taking a look another great choice of BCG. The PSA 5.56 Premium Full Auto BCG deserves a place on this list. If you're looking for something that is going to be excellent in quality and performance, you're looking at it right now. This is made right here in the U.S.A., so obviously, it is guaranteed to be the best in quality and performance. Most gun manufacturers often follow strict guidelines for making this happen. So if you see that any gun accessory is made in the U.S.A., you know that the quality will be the best period. This is a shot-peened bolt, which means that it’s been shot during its course of tests. This is designed for overall durability. Plus, it has also passed the pressure test with flying colors, meaning this will have the ability to handle high-pressure cartridges. To ensure a long life, the BCG has a chrome lining in the interior, which means it will be resistant to rust or corrosion. Inside and out, this is a tough customer that will make sure your .300 Blackout rifle functions properly. Bottom Line PSA is considered one of the more reliable brands of all kinds of guns and accessories . On top of that, they offer them at affordable prices. So if you’re on a budget and want a product that’s considered one of the best, you might want to consider the PSA brand. 5. Cryptic Coatings Mystic Bronze Complete BCG CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros The Finish is Beyond Perfect Will Last You Years, if Not Decades Works Perfectly With Binary Triggers Cons None Next on the agenda, we have the Cryptic Coatings Mystic Bronze Complete BCG. This is one of six BCGs available in all kinds of high luster coatings. The purpose of these coatings is to regulate the temperature all while the BCG gives your .300 Blackout rifle stellar performance. Not only will you get a stellar performance, but you can also expect this to reduce a good deal of recoil on your rifle and provide reliable, consistent cycling. In plain English, you're dealing with a BCG that will give you smooth, non-jammed shots every time you pull the trigger. No matter what your intended purpose for your .300 Blackout, the CC BCG will prove itself to be a great alternative to any of the other good quality BCGs you'll find on the market. The interior is chrome-lined so it won’t be damaged and will be resistant to corrosion and rust. If longevity is something you consider a top priority, there might be nothing better than the CC BCG. On top of that, this is wear-resistant, so you may consider this BCG the last one you’ll need to buy for years or even decades. If that’s exactly what you’re looking for, consider the Cryptic Coatings BCG as a finalist on your shortlist of possible buys. Bottom Line This is probably one of the best on the market in terms of BCGs for the .300 Blackout. At this rate, we won’t be surprised if this topples the top product on the list in the not so distant future. This not only plays a role in temperature control, but is also top-notch in overall performance and quality. If you choose this for your BCG, don’t be surprised if this puppy lasts you a long period of time. If you’re planning on using your rifle for a long period of time, you’ll need a product that is built to last, and the CC BCG is just that. Full-Auto vs. Semi-Auto Bolt Carrier Groups So, what’s the difference between fully automatic and semi-automatic bolt carrier groups? And are they legal to own? The short answer to the legality question is yes. However, it is important to double check your local and state laws prior to purchasing, just to make sure. Other than that, a fully automatic BCG has a rear lug that can push the sear release in a downward direction, allowing the gun to fire in full auto mode (or burst fire mode). Semi-automatic BCGs are extra cut so won’t take up a lot of mass. The lesser amount of mass is also a plus if you want the best in reliability. Semi-Auto BCGs are more affordable compared to their fully auto counterparts. Conclusion Finding the best BCG for a .300 Blackout doesn't have to be a challenge. But it is a must-have if you want your .300 Blackout rifle to function properly. Your search may take some time, but it's important to find the best one that will fit your rifle properly and last you years or even decades. Be sure to do more in-depth research if you come across a BCG that you like prior to purchase. We hate buyer's remorse and don't want you to go through it. So be sure to listen to what people are saying about it and use your best judgment when the time comes to choose a BCG of your own.

Best Water Filter Pitchers for 2020

Everyone needs clean water and most people hope that the water coming from their tap is clean and safe.  But year after year, the world’s water supply is getting worse and worse, not better. It seems like every time we turn around there is another “boil water advisory” or “water contaminant advisory” being sent out by local water municipalities or appearing in the media. It is no longer just Flint, Michigan with a water crisis, it is everywhere in the modern world. With this in mind, we felt that it was necessary to review all of the available water pitchers/jugs and rank them for 2020. Quick Navigation Best Water Filter Pitchers: Top Picks 1.  Epic Pure "Water Filter Pitcher" Review 2.  Camelbak Relay Water Filter Pitcher Review 3.  ZeroWater Filter Pitcher Review 4. Pur Water Filter Pitcher Review 5. Brita Water Filter Pitcher Review Final Results Best Water Filter Pitchers: Top Picks 1.  Epic Pure Water Filter Pitcher Review Award: Best for Contaminant Reduction & Versatility This water filter pitcher has all the design features you would want plus two choices of super-strong American made filters for removing water contaminants like lead, bacteria, viruses & fluoride. Epic Water Filters products have been tested by multiple labs and last for 150 gallons which is 3 to 4 times longer than their competitors.  How do they do it?  Simple, each filter really has 3 independent filters inside? When one becomes clogged, the other two are still working. The first filter we tried was the Epic Pure filter which is gear towards common tap water contaminants like lead, fluoride, PFOA, PFOS, trace pharmaceuticals, and heavy metals.  The other filter we tried that fits on the same pitcher was the Epic Nano, which also removes bacteria, viruses, giardia, cryptosporidium, and microbial cysts. PROS: This pitcher received a major redesign for 2018.   "Epic Water Filters" has made a ton of improvements on their already popular water pitcher, the Epic Pure Water Filter Pitcher .  The new design improvements include a new secure lid, better ergonomic handle, digital filter replacement alert, clear reservoir to see the water level, reservoir design improvement to eliminate cross-contamination between water in the reservoir, and filtered water in bottom of the pitcher, and one-handed fill-up operation.  What we really like about this water pitcher is that this is one of the few filters to be tested to remove over 200+ contaminants including fluoride, lead, chemicals, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals. In addition, Epic’s new filter, the Epic Nano which is made in the United States, also removes bacteria, viruses, and cysts.  Every year, hundreds of thousands of people in the United States get sick due to drinking contaminated water with one of these waterborne pathogens both in the city and from wells. We do not know of any water pitcher on the market that is doing nanofiltration like the Epic Pure The Epic Pure.  In addition, millions of people in the USA are unknowingly exposed to harmful contaminants in the water like Lead, PFOA/PFOS, and Pesticides.  We like the fact that the Epic Pure "The Epic Pure" has a strong filter, removes more contaminants, and they provide 3rd party testing on their website.  Also, taste matters and the water from the Epic Pure The Epic Pure tastes fabulous, it was by far the best tasting water out of the jugs we tested. The Epic Pure Pitcher is available in either white or navy blue. CONS: The Epic Pure was great but the Epic Nano filter was slower than the other filters we tested but it was also the only filter to remove bacteria, viruses, and cysts. I guess if you want clean water, it takes a little bit of time to remove all of those contaminants.  It is also the most expensive option out of these water pitchers but that might be the price you pay for clean water. Check out our Epic Pitcher vs Brita Pitcher head to head review. #1 Pitcher #1 Pitcher The Epic Pure Pitcher Eliminates 99% of contaminates. Made in USA. Recommended by SurvivalCache! Filter life is 3-4 months of typical use Removes Fluoride from water Check Latest Price #1 Pitcher #1 Pitcher The Epic Nano Pitcher Eliminates 99% of contaminates. Made in USA. Recommended by SurvivalCache! Filter life is 3-4 months of typical use Certified to NSF/ANSI STANDARDS 42, 53, 401, P473, and P231 "Check Latest Price" 2.  Camelbak Relay The Epic Pure Review Award: Good For A Quick Filter & Made From Durable Plastic PROS : The Camelbak Relay looks pretty cool and the filter is crazy fast, as much as 10x faster than a normal Brita filter.  This radical new design also works well to fit into small refrigerators and can fit into most refrigerator doors. I also like that the Camelbak Relay comes in several different colors, so hipsters can now get a purple water pitcher to match their kitchen.  Camelbak Relay also made the water taste pretty good, it came in second in the taste test. CONS : With a fast filter comes low filtration.  The Camelbak will change the taste of your water but that is about it.  If you are looking to remove contaminants from your water, you might want to look elsewhere.  Lead, Chromium 6, PFOA/PFOS, Chemicals, Pesticides, Herbicides, all pass right through this filter and into your glass.  Also, when we first put the lid on the snaps they were really tough to secure. The snaps became more user-friendly after a very short time. It’s small in size (but this could also be a plus, depending upon preference. I like the small design, for example, and my husband would like it bigger).  Other than chlorine and “odors,” it’s not clear what the filter removes from water. 3.  ZeroThe Epic Pure Review Award: Good for TDS If you believe in the TDS meters for water quality, and a lot of people do and a lot of people don’t, then ZeroWater might be the filter for you.  Made in China, the filter will get you water down to zero TDS rating for the first 20 gallons. PROS : While we don’t expect the ZeroWater pitcher to be winning any awards for artistic inspiration, we did find the ZeroWater pitcher to be a more ergonomic experience overall. In addition to being easier to hold and to pour, the handle felt more comfortable in our hands.  It was still more bulky and heavy compared to the Epic Pure The Epic Pure but if you are trying to decide between Brita and Zero, go ZeroWater all of the way. This pitcher filter is also pretty cheap. In addition, the ZeroWater 10-Cup Pitcher has a spout on the bottom of the pitcher, which makes it easier to pour water into a glass without taking the pitcher out of the refrigerator completely.  For young children or the elderly, both of which can sometimes struggle with wrist strength, we think the ZeroWater pitcher is a good option. We also liked that ZeroWater removed some contaminants but again, nothing compared to the Epic Pure Filter Pitcher Review. CONS : Comparing the taste of different water filters is difficult, largely because it is simply so subjective. Nevertheless, we did set up a taste test, and found that Epic Water Filters &; Camelbak beat ZeroWater overall on taste.  We actually found the taste of Brita to be better than ZeroWater as well. The ZeroWater pitcher is also so cheap, it makes us wonder what the filter is doing and how it is made.  Just say…  Also, we did not like the big bulky filter – it feels like a small torpedo, seems a little bit much. ZeroWater ZP-010, 10 Cup "Filter Pitcher Review" with Water Quality Meter 10 CUP WATER FILTERING PITCHER: You'll always have cleaner, pure tasting water on hand with our... FIVE STAGE WATER FILTRATION: Unlike many water filters & pitchers, ZeroWater filters use 5 stages of... See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 05:09 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API 4. Pur Filter Pitcher Review Review Award: Mr. Average PROS : The filter on the Pur Pitcher was quick and the water tastes great.  The cost was “cheap as chips” so if you are on a budget, this might be the water filter pitcher for you.  The ergonomics of the pitcher are fine and the operation was easy and straightforward. CONS : The Pur Pitcher only lasts for 40 gallons and it appears to be fairly cheaply made.  According to their website, they do remove some contaminants but again you are sacrificing clean water for speed. Personally, I would rather wait a few extra minutes and know my water is clean. Also, this filter does not remove bacteria, virus, or cysts and with 20,000 boil alerts in the United States over the last 3 years, this statistic might be worth considering when making your water filter pitcher selection. 5. Brita Filter Pitcher Review Review Award: Least Expensive PROS : What water filter pitcher list could be complete without including Brita? Brita is pretty straightforward, good design, fast filtering, water tasted good.  They have been in the business for awhile so they know how to put together a water filter pitcher.  The pitchers are cheap and you can buy generic replacement filters for next to nothing. CONS :  When you peel back the curtain, you find out that the Brita does not really remove a lot of contaminants. So if you are concerned (Like me) about things like lead, fluoride, chloramine, TTHMs, trace pharmaceuticals, herbicides, pesticides, heavy metals, and a lot more in your water, then you probably won’t be using a Brita.  If you are on a budget and just want to change the taste of your water from Chlorine to something more tolerable, then you have found your match in Brita. Make sure to check out our article on Do Brita Filters Work? Final Results After reviewing testing results for contaminant removal, testing the flow rate of the pitchers, the ergonomics & operation of the pitchers, and the all important taste test. We have concluded that the Epic Pure Filter Pitcher Review is the best water filter pitcher. With a “Love it” or your money back guarantee and high levels of contaminant removal, it is hard to go wrong with the Epic Pure Pitcher. #1 Pitcher #1 Pitcher Filter Pitcher Review Pitcher Eliminates 99% of contaminates. Made in USA. Recommended by SurvivalCache! Filter life is 3-4 months of typical use Removes Fluoride from water Check Latest Price Other interesting articles: Sawyer Mini Water Filter Review for 2020: Is this a Good Survival Filter? LifeStraw Personal "Water Filter Review" : Is This A "Good Survival Filter" in 2020? Sawyer Squeeze Mini Water Filter Review for 2020 Hydroviv Water Filter Review for 2020: Survival Gear Hands-On

ALG Defense 6 Second Mount: Initial Thoughts

It’s costs half of the host gun. It adds weight, bulk, and there are almost no available holsters for it. Why is the 6 second mount worthwhile? That’s a question I will have to answer as I go along. The mount and red dot is a difficult beast to tame. I can just tell from handling this setup at home that I will need to be very precise with my grip and presentation of this pistol from the draw or I won’t have that dot anywhere in the window. Any bit of twist or improper grip and the dot is lost. I have to grip the weapon perfectly to find that dot dead center in the glass, and that’s been my goal with the first few days hands on: develop muscle memory to aid in fast sight acquisition. Forget this mount if you haven’t mastered your draw and presentation of the pistol, for the mount and red dot will slow you down significantly if you are a novice to the pistol. The mount is attached through the trigger pin and slides into the polymer rail. Purple loc-tite (not included) keeps all the screws together to inhibit backing out. The 6 second mount is front heavy, and when a TLR-1 or similar tactical light is added, there is a huge weight shift forward of the trigger guard. I am wondering how much this weight shift at the muzzle will dampen muzzle flip, because it will no doubt affect how flat this gun shoots as equipped. Also of note, you see every little… tiny… bit of movement on trigger squeeze with the red dot. It was cheaper for me to order the mount from Texas than it was to walk down the street to ALG defense and buy it in cash. Tax laws. Awesome. The rear sight must be removed to allow easy disassembly unless you want to remove the entire mount each time you clean the pistol. I removed the rear sight. The front sight may stay in place, but a key-note is that the front sight must be on the shorter side instead of the longer front sight assembly’s such as the fiber optic equipped front sights… the length of these sights will cause them to impact the 6 second mount during recoil. I believe it would literally shear the sight right off the slide. I kept the small plastic nub of a front sight that came with the G17 in place. ALG defense 6 second mount with G17 slide removed Once it is removed, it permits some work and cleaning of the G17, particularly the rear of the pistol. It does not permit trigger removal, or slide stop removal without removing the ALG mount from the G17 frame. Overall my first thoughts are… why did I buy this? Oh yea… because I want a practical pistol that I can use both in USPSA open division and keep around the house as a reliable pistol for self-defense. Once my custom holster has been made, I can conceal this setup in under a coat or jacket and have as close to a PDW in a portable package as I can get. Overkill? Maybe. But it’s going to be oh so much fun to master this setup. Simulated Sight Picture:I have not been to the range yet with this setup. Stay tuned to looserounds.com and here on TNR for my USPSA pistol series featuring video of the ALG Defense 6 Second Mount. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Looking at a super small and concealable gun that can fire big bullets ? The concept of a Derringer (originally Deringer, with one “r”) has remained immensely popular since its inception. And that idea has kept these tiny defensive powerhouses in production for over 150 years. Early 1900s Remington Arms-U.